WELCOME

Visit Rudyard Lake and take a step back in time; a place where the past has not spoilt the present; it has in fact enhanced the area through the establishment of a rural landscape and heavily wooded hillsides.

 

Rudyard Lake provides some of the most dramatic scenery to be found in the Staffordshire Moorlands and over 500,000 visitors come to her shores each year.

 

The Lake covers some 168 acres and is over 2.5 miles long.

It is owned by the Canal & River Trust and the commercial leisure activities are managed by Rudyard Lake Ltd. which employs a full time ranger on site.

 

 The African Blondin

The African Blondin

 Chris Bull recreates the daring tightrope walk for ′A Day at the Lake′ May 2016

Chris Bull recreates the daring tightrope walk for ′A Day at the Lake′ May 2016

The Activity Centre

A BRIEF HISTORY

The Lake was built as a reservoir in 1797; even to this day the Lake still supplies the canal system for which it was designed and remains an active working reservoir. Today, of course, it plays a major role in the provision of leisure pursuits as opposed to its industrial origins.

 

 

The Lake is the place where Rudyard Kipling’s parents first met, where Captain Webb, the first channel swimmer, came to demonstrate his skills and where The African Blondin (Carlos Trower) appeared several times amazing the crowds 30m above the Lake on a tightrope. Little wonder it became known as the ‘Blackpool of the Potteries’ in its heyday.

 

The North Staffs Railway used to run along the eastern shores of the Lake and a narrow gauge railway now runs along this track to approximately its halfway point. The steam trains would bring golfers, stopping at a small halt at the northern end of the Lake. The golfers would be met by their caddies, and escorted around the northern perimeter to the western shore, where the golf course was located. The golf course closed in 1926 owing to the competition from other golf courses, which had become established closer to the city.

 

The Visitors Centre

FUNDING & PRESERVATION

Thanks to The Heritage Lottery Fund, the Visitor Centre, which first opened in 2001, has been completely transformed and now contains the very latest technology enabling visitors to access a wealth of archive material and digital recordings.

Visitors are encouraged to recall their memories of the lake and what it means to them, these can then be recorded for future generations to enjoy.

 

 

Activities & Attractions

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